Process

The process I find most successful has six stages. It does involve some meetings but they’re essential for a lighting scheme that you’ll be happy with.

  • We meet on site to discuss your taste and how you see your house, flat or room working.
  • I mark up a lighting plan by hand which shows the exact positioning of fittings and circuits. For the sake of clarity, I find it useful to talk you through this on site.
  • Then I make detailed notes for the electrician. This includes product sheets, a circuit schedule and detailed installation notes.
  • We have another meeting. This time to discuss and confirm any amendments to the original proposed scheme. Changes tend to occur during a project and may be because of furniture, layout, architectural obstacles or simply a change of mind. Amendments do involve a certain amount of re-drawing, re-specification and general co-ordination. You may want to set aside a moderate contingency fund with this in mind.
  • Throughout the project, I’ll be keeping an eye on progress, attention to detail, budget and time. I will also liaise with contractors, AV consultants and garden designers.

At the end of the project, when art works, fabrics and furniture are in position, I’ll make a visit to focus lights, add lenses and to finalise control system programmes and set scenes with the electrician or AV consultant if this is required. I’ll also run you through the system to show how it works.

Personal

Lighting is a very personal thing. I’d prefer to spend time with you discussing your preferences and tastes, rather than viewing an interior and prescribing a lighting scheme. You’re the person living there and it has to be right. A client-centred approach is the way to achieve this.

Of course I’ll suggest effects and new developments in equipment and fittings but this will always be filtered through my understanding of the personality you want to give your place or room.

My Approach

I see lighting as an integral part of architecture and interior design. It’s a very powerful tool, both functionally and decoratively. Frequently undervalued, lighting is often treated as an afterthought at the end of a project, almost always to the detriment of an interior.

Atmosphere and mood vs tech-spec

The combination of new lighting technology and legal regulations can often bewilder the layman. Rest assured, I will always talk you through this in plain English, minus jargon. Having said that, I think it’s important to stress that I never forget the aesthetics of a project.

My arts background (I have a degree in the History of Art) and interior design training mean that I’m able to bridge the gap between the electrician’s technical knowledge and the spatial, functional and emotional benefits you want in your home.

Personal

Lighting is a very personal thing. I’d prefer to spend time with you discussing your preferences and tastes, rather than viewing an interior and prescribing a lighting scheme. You’re the person living there and it has to be right. A client-centred approach is the way to achieve this.

Of course I’ll suggest effects and new developments in equipment and fittings but this will always be filtered through my understanding of the personality you want to give your place or room.